Nyquist/Levinson Rev. 4 PCB Kit - 60%/40% Split Ortholinear Keyboard

$79.99 $79.99 Sale Save

The Nyquist is a 60% split ortholinear keyboard, that can also be converted easily to a 40% split ortholinear by breaking off the bottom row (by hand). Now featuring hotswap sockets, so just pop in your switches, and you are good to go!

Improvements with Rev. 4 PCBs: New features include per-key RGB, hotswap sockets, and a more powerful on-board microcontroller!!

Features

  • MX Hotswap sockets
  • Option for rotary encoders at top-left and top-right corners (non-hotswappable)
    • Bottom row can optionally be broken off to convert the board into a Levinson layout (4x12 split)
    • Per-key RGB LEDs and underglow LEDs pre-installed
    • USB-C port
    • Compatible with MX-style switches only
    • QMK compatible, pre-flashed with VIA support for easy remapping of keys
    • The right half PCB has an optional 4-pin JST port add-on that can be used to reflash the PCB if you decide to break off the main USB-C port (for compatibility with SP50 case). Use JST-SH cable with Micro-USB breakout board or USB-C breakout board if doing this.

       

    PCB Kit

    • Comes with left half PCB and right half PCB
    • RP2040 MCU integrated on-board
    • Per-key RGB LEDs for each switch
    • 8 RGB underglow LEDs on each half

      Other parts needed for build

      Build Guide

      Work-in-progress

      Case Design Files

      Files available on GitHub

      Default Keymapping

      The default keymapping that the board is pre-programmed with can be found here: Default Keymaps

      Customer Reviews

      Based on 4 reviews
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      M
      Mr. E. Panda
      Easy to Put Together Nyquist

      This keyboard is the most comfortable keyboard I own. This is easily my favorite keyboard to type on, because of the key placements. As someone with a handicap that affects their typing, this keyboard makes me feel like I can type like normal again. Just snap on the switches with the case, and you are good to go. I had to spend some time programming the board, but that was part of the fun. This way, I could learn what layouts work best for me and where my fingers go naturally, now that I am not constrained to the traditional keyboard. I put some silent linear on this bad boy, and the silence in which I type has been the best experience. You can put clicky switches on it, if you really want. You will get a very satisfyingly isolated click per keystroke.

      Before this keyboard, I loved typing my ZSA Ergodox EZ. Even with silent switches, the acoustics of the Ergodox case are very loud and jarring, very annoying. The Nyquist easily beats it by a mile.

      I have had an older Nyquist Rev. 2 board that requires soldering for years. I had always told myself I was going to learn to solder to make my keyboard, but I never had the time. I built this keyboard in about two hours. It's very easy to program, too, once you figure out how you would like to type.

      R
      Renata Torrez
      Levinson

      Went with 40% Levinson. Breaking the PCB made me so nervous!

      Easy to put together. Very easy to adjust to the layout. Love how it looks.

      j
      justin field
      Great Series

      It seems like the iris gets all the love for some reason, but I truly think this is the best practical keyboard.

      I've been using this keyboard for many generations at this point, back when you used to have to soldier everything yourself.

      I want to make another low profile version, like this one: https://www.reddit.com/r/olkb/comments/vopv9m/keebio_nyquist_with_custom_laser_cut_bottom_plate/.

      A
      Amir

      Fantastic keyboard